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SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA - STS - 65 CREW - COMMEMORATIVE ENVELOPE SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: RICHARD HIEB, COLONEL CARL E. WALZ, COLONEL ROBERT CABANA, DONALD A. THOMAS, COLONEL JAMES HALSELL, LEROY CHIAO, CHIAKI MUKAI - HFSID 296206

 
SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA: STS-65 MISSION
Commemorative Envelope signed by all 7 crew members: Cabana, Halsell, Hieb, Chiao, Thomas, Walz and Mukai
Commemorative Envelope signed: "Bob Cabana", "Jim Halsell", "Rick Hieb", "Leroy Chiao", "Donald Thomas", "Carl Walz", "Chiaki Mukai", 6½x3½. Envelope postmarked Kennedy Space Center, July 8, 1993 and July 23, 1993. Space shuttle mission STS-65, aboard Columbia, launched from the Kennedy Space Center on July 8, 1993 and returned to the same site on July 23. This mission conducted the second in a series of microgravity experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency, and the space agencies of Japan, Canada, German and France, as well as NASA. Newts and jellyfish were used to study embryonic development in microgravity. The crew included Commander ROBERT CABANA; Pilot JAMES D. HALSELL; and Mission Specialists RICHARD HIEB, LEROY CHIAO, DONALD THOMAS, CARL E. WALZ and CHIAKI MUKAI. Mukai was the first Japanese woman in space. Fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SPACE SHUTTLE COLUMBIA - STS - 65 CREW   COLONEL JAMES HALSELL   LEROY CHIAO   CHIAKI MUKAI   RICHARD HIEB   COLONEL CARL E. WALZ   COLONEL ROBERT CABANA   DONALD A. THOMAS  


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COLONEL JAMES HALSELL
Born: September 29, 1956 in West Monroe, Louisiana

James Donald Halsell, Jr., (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born September 29, 1956, in West Monroe, Louisiana, where his parents, Don and Jean Halsell, reside. Married to the former Kathy D. Spooner of Merritt Island, Florida, where her parents, Charles and Lynn Spooner, reside. They have a son and a daughter. He enjoys snow skiing, water skiing and light aircraft flying.

EDUCATION: Graduated from West Monroe High School, West Monroe, Louisiana, in 1974. Received a bachelor of science degree in engineering from the United States Air Force (USAF) Academy in 1978, a master of science degree in management from Troy University in 1983, and a master of science degree in space operations from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1985.

SPECIAL HONORS: Graduated first in his test pilot school class and awarded the Liethen/Tittle Trophy (1986). Recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross (1998), the NASA Space Flight Medal (1994, 1995, 1997, 2000), the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (2001), and the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal (2002, 2004).

AIR FORCE EXPERIENCE: Halsell graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1978, and from Undergraduate Pilot Training at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, in 1979. An F-4 pilot qualified in conventional and nuclear weapons deliveries, he served at Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada, from 1980-1981, and Moody Air Force Base, Valdosta, Georgia, from 1982-1984. In 1984-1985, he was a graduate student at the Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. He then attended the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California, and during the next four years he performed test flights in the F-4, the F-16, and the SR-71 aircraft. Halsell retired from the Air Force in July 2004.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Halsell became an astronaut in July 1991. A five flight veteran, Halsell has logged over 1,250 hours in space. He was the pilot on STS-65 (July 8-23, 1994) and STS-74 (November 12-20, 1995), and commanded STS-83 (Apr 4-8, 1997), STS-94 (July 1-17, 1997) and STS-101 (May 19-29, 2000). From February-August 1998, he served as NASA Director of Operations at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia. Halsell also served as Manager, Shuttle Launch Integration, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, from July 2000-January 2003. Following the Columbia accident, Halsell led NASA's Space Shuttle Return-to-Flight Planning Team. He then served as the Assistant Director for Aircraft Operations, Flight Crew Operations Directorate. Halsell retired from NASA in November 2006 to accept a position with ATK Launch Systems, Utah.

ADDITIONAL MISSION DETAILS: STS-65 flew the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2). During the 15-day flight the crew conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles in 353 hours and 55 minutes.

STS-74 was NASA's second Space Shuttle mission to rendezvous and dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the 8-day flight the Atlantis crew successfully attached a permanent docking module to Mir and transferred over 2,000 pounds of food, water and scientific supplies for use by the cosmonauts. The STS-74 mission was accomplished in 129 orbits of the Earth, traveling 3.4 million miles in 196 hours, 30 minutes, 44 seconds.

STS-83, the Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) Spacelab mission, was cut short because of problems with one of the Shuttle's three fuel cell power generation units. Mission duration was 95 hours and 12 minutes, traveling 1.5 million miles in 63 orbits of the Earth.

STS-94, a re-flight of the Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) Spacelab mission, focused on materials and combustion science research in microgravity. Mission duration was 376 hours and 45 minutes, traveling 6.3 million miles in 251 orbits of the Earth.

STS-101 was the third Shuttle mission devoted to International Space Station (ISS) construction. Objectives included transporting and installing over 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies, and conducting a space walk. The mission was accomplished in 155 orbits of the Earth, traveling 4.1 million miles in 236 hours and 9 minutes.




LEROY CHIAO
Born: August 28, 1960 in Danville, California

Leroy Chiao (Ph.D.)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born August 28, 1960, Dr. Chiao grew up in Danville, California. He enjoys flying his Grumman Tiger aircraft, as well as downhill skiing. He speaks Mandarin Chinese and Russian. Leroy and Karen Chiao married in 2003.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Monte Vista High School, Danville, California, in 1978; received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983, and a Master of Science degree and a Doctorate in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1985 and 1987.

SPECIAL HONORS: Recipient of four NASA Space Flight Medals (2005, 2000, 1996, 1994), and numerous awards, including the NASA Distinguished Service Medal (2005), two NASA Exceptional Service Awards (2000, 1996), four NASA Individual Achievement Awards (2004, 2003, 2002, 2001), two NASA Group Achievement awards (1997, 1995) and the NASA Going the Extra Mile Award (2004). Recipient of numerous Federation Aeronautique Internationale awards, including the Korolev Diploma (2002), Komarov Diploma (1996) and De La Vaulx Medal (1994). Recipient of Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of California, Santa Barbara (1995). Recipient of two Phi Kappa Tau awards - the Taylor A. Borradaile National Alumnus of the Year Award (1996) and the Nu Chapter Alumnus of the Year (1991) award. Recipient of the 2005 Science and Technology Asian Pacific American Heritage Association Award. Recipient of the 2003 Excellence Award in Science and Technology, from the US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce. Recipient of the 100 Most Influential Asian Americans in the 1990's Award from A-Magazine (2000). Keynote Commencement Speaker for the Departments of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, and at Santa Barbara (1996). Invited lecturer on honeycomb material and bonded panels, and cure modeling of aerospace composite materials, at the Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, and at the Changsha Institute of Technology, 5th Department, in the Peoples Republic of China (1988). Invited contributor to the International Encyclopedia of Composite Materials (1989).

EXPERIENCE: Dr. Chiao graduated in 1987 from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and joined the Hexcel Corporation in Dublin, California. He worked for Hexcel until 1989, during which time he was involved in process, manufacturing, and engineering research on advanced aerospace materials. He worked on a joint NASA-JPL/Hexcel project to develop an optically correct, polymer composite precision segment reflector, for future space telescopes. He also worked on cure modeling and finite element analysis. In January of 1989 Dr. Chiao joined the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, where he was involved in processing research for fabrication of filament-wound and thick-section aerospace composites, where he developed and demonstrated a mechanistic cure model for graphite fiber/epoxy composite material. An instrument-rated pilot, Dr. Chiao has logged over 2600 flight hours in a variety of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Chiao became an Astronaut in July 1991. He is qualified for flight assignment as a Space Station Commander, Space Station Science Officer and as a Space Shuttle Mission Specialist. His technical assignments to date include: Space Shuttle flight software verification in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL); Crew Equipment, Spacelab, Spacehab and Payloads issues for the Astronaut Office Mission Development Branch; Training and Flight Data File issues; EVA issues for the EVA Branch. Dr. Chiao also served as Chief of the Astronaut Office EVA Branch. A veteran of four space flights, he flew as a Mission Specialist on STS-65 (July 8-23, 1994), STS-72 (January 11-20, 1996) and STS-92 (October 11-24, 2000), and was the Commander and NASA Science Officer on Expedition-10 (October 13 to April 24, 2005). Dr. Chiao has logged a total of 229 days, 7 hours, 38 minutes and 5 seconds in space, including 36 hours and 7 minutes of EVA time in six space walks. In December 2005, Dr. Chiao retired from NASA to pursue private interests.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-65 Columbia (July 8-23, 1994) launched from and returned to land at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, setting a Federation Aeronautique Internationale flight duration record for P2 spacecraft. The STS-65 mission flew the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2). During the 15-day flight the seven-member crew conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The STS-65 mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles in 353 hours and 55 minutes. On this mission, Dr. Chiao became the 196th NASA Astronaut to fly in space and the 311th human in space.

STS-72 Endeavour (January 11-20, 1996) was a 9-day mission during which the crew retrieved the Space Flyer Unit (launched from Japan 10-months earlier), and deployed and retrieved the OAST-Flyer. Dr. Chiao performed two spacewalks designed to demonstrate tools and hardware, and evaluate techniques to be used in the assembly of the International Space Station. In completing this mission, Dr. Chiao logged a total of 214 hours and 41 seconds in space, including 12 hours and 57 minutes EVA time, and traveled 3.7 million miles in 142 orbits of the Earth. During this flight, Dr. Chiao became the first Asian-American and ethnic Chinese to perform a spacewalk.

STS-92 Discovery (October 11-24, 2000) was launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida and returned to land at Edwards Air Force Base, California. During the 13-day flight, the seven-member crew attached the Z1 Truss and Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 to the International Space Station (ISS) using Discovery's robotic arm and performed four space walks to configure these elements. This expansion of the ISS opened the door for future assembly missions and prepared the station for its first resident crew. Dr. Chiao was the EVA/Construction Lead for this mission and totaled 13 hours and 16 minutes of EVA time in two space walks. The STS-92 mission was accomplished in 202 orbits, traveling 5.3 million miles in 12 days, 21 hours, 40 minutes and 25 seconds.

Expedition-10 (October 13, 2004 to April 24, 2005). Dr. Chiao was the Commander and NASA Science Officer of the 10th mission to the International Space Station. Expedition-10 launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on October 13, 2004 aboard Soyuz TMA-5 and docked with the ISS on October 15, 2004. During his six and a half month stay aboard the station, Dr. Chiao performed numerous tasks including 20 science experiments and two repair and installation space walks, using the Russian “Orlan” space suit, totaling 9 hours, 56 minutes of EVA time on this flight. Expedition-10 concluded its successful mission on April 24, 2005 with a safe landing in Kazakhstan. With this mission, Dr. Chiao became the first Asian-American and ethnic Chinese Mission Commander.




CHIAKI MUKAI
Born: May 6, 1952 in Tatebayashi, Gunma, Japan

Dr. Mukai was born in 1952 in Tatebayashi, Gunma. She received her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1977 and Doctorate in Physiology in 1988, from Keio University School of Medicine.
In 1989, she became a board-certified cardiovascular surgeon in the Japan Surgical Society.

From 1977 through 1978, Dr. Mukai worked as a resident in General Surgery, Keio University Hospital. She was on the medical staff in General Surgery, Shimizu General Hospital in Shizuoka in 1978 and on the medical staff in Emergency Surgery, Saiseikai Kanagawa Hospital in Kanagawa in 1979. Dr. Mukai began her work as a resident in Cardiovascular Surgery, Keio University Hospital in 1980, and served on the medical staff in Cardiovascular Surgery, Saiseikai Utsunomiya Hospital in Tochigi in 1982. She returned to Keio University Hospital in 1983 as the chief resident in Cardiovascular Surgery and was later promoted to an assistant professor of the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Keio University.

In 1985, Dr. Mukai was selected by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA, currently Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) as one of the three Japanese Payload Specialists (PSs) for the First Material Processing Test (FMPT), which flew on the STS-47 (Spacelab) mission.
In July 1994, she flew as a PS on the STS-65 (the Second International Microgravity Laboratory: IML-2) mission, which consisted of 82 life science (human physiology, space biology, radiation biology and bioprocess) and microgravity science (material and fluid science, research on microgravity environment and countermeasures) experiments.

As a NASDA science astronaut, she became a visiting scientist of the Division of Cardiovascular Physiology, Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), from 1987 through 1988.
From 1992, Dr. Mukai worked as a research instructor in the Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Houston, as well as serving as a visiting professor of the Department of Surgery, Keio University school of Medicine from 1992 to 1998.

During the STS-47 (Spacelab J) mission in 1992 and the STS-90 (Neurolab) mission in 1998, Dr. Mukai served as a Spacelab communicator for crew science operations as a backup PS. In October 1998, she flew on the STS-95 mission as a PS along with US Senator John Glenn, the first American astronaut to orbit the Earth. During the STS-95 mission, she conducted various life science and space medicine experiments.

In August 2000, Dr. Mukai was assigned as a deputy mission scientist for the STS-107 mission to coordinate science operations for the mission, which was launched in January 2003.

From September 2004 through September 2007, she worked as a visiting professor at the International Space University (ISU). She provided her specialized knowledge on space medicine and human space exploration health management for the ISU Master Program students.

From October 2007 through March 2011, she served as Director of the Space Biomedical Research Office, Human Space Technology and Astronaut Department, Human Space System and Utilization Mission Directorate of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

From April 2011, Dr. Mukai has been serving as Senior Advisor to the JAXA Executive Director.

From July 2012, Dr. Mukai has been the Director of JAXA Center for Applied Space Medicine and Human Reserach (J-CASMHR).




RICHARD HIEB
Born: September 21, 1955 in Jamestown, North Dakota

Richard J. Hieb
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born September 21, 1955, in Jamestown, North Dakota. Married to the former Jeannie Hendricks of Norfolk, Virginia. They have two children. He enjoys sports and family outings. His parents, Mr. & Mrs. Fred Hieb, reside in Jamestown, North Dakota. Her mother, Mrs. Jean Hendricks, resides in Norfolk, Virginia. Her father, Mr. John R. Hendricks, is deceased.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Jamestown High School, Jamestown, North Dakota, in 1973; received a bachelor of arts degree in math and physics from Northwest Nazarene College in 1977, and a master of science degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado in 1979.

NASA EXPERIENCE: After graduating from the University of Colorado in 1979, Mr. Hieb came directly to NASA to work in crew procedures development and crew activity planning. He worked in the Mission Control Center on the ascent team for STS-1, and during rendezvous phases on numerous subsequent flights. He has an extensive background in on-orbit procedures development, particularly in rendezvous and proximity operations.

Selected by NASA in June 1985, Mr. Hieb became an astronaut in July 1986, qualified for assignment as a mission specialist on future Space Shuttle flight crews. Since then he has held a variety of technical assignments including launch support activities at Kennedy Space Center, and has served in both the Mission Development Branch and in the Operations Development Branch of the Astronaut Office. He supported the STS-26 mission as a part of the close-out crew prior to launch and as a part of the change-out crew just after landing. A veteran of three space flights, Mr. Hieb flew on STS-39 in 1991, STS-49 in 1992, and STS-65 in 1994. He has logged over 750 hours in space, including over 17 hours of EVA (space walk).

Mr. Hieb first flew on the crew of STS-39, an unclassified Department of Defense mission which launched on April 28, 1991 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the mission, he was responsible for operating the Infrared Background Signature Satellite (IBSS) from within the payload bay, on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) and as a free-flying satellite. He also operated the RMS to release the IBSS, and then to retrieve the IBSS a day and a half later. After 134 orbits of the Earth which covered 3.5 million miles and lasted just over 199 hours, the crew landed at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on May 6, 1991.

Mr. Hieb was also a mission specialist on the crew of STS-49, the maiden voyage of the new Space Shuttle Endeavour, which launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on May 7, 1992. During that mission, Hieb along with astronaut Pierre Thuot, performed three space walks which resulted in the capture and repair of the stranded Intelsat VI F3 communications satellite. The third space walk, which also included astronaut Tom Akers, was the first ever three-person space walk. This 8 hour and 29 minute space walk, the longest in history, broke a twenty year old record that was held by Apollo 17 astronauts. The mission concluded on May 16, 1992 with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, after orbiting the Earth 141 times in 213 hours and traveling 3.7 million miles.

Mr. Hieb was the payload commander on the second flight of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) on Space Shuttle Mission STS-65. The mission launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 8, 1994, and returned there on July 23, 1994, setting a new flight duration record for the Space Shuttle program. During the 15-day flight the crew conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles.




COLONEL CARL E. WALZ
Born: September 6, 1955 in Cleveland, Ohio

Carl E. Walz (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born September 6, 1955, in Cleveland, Ohio. Married to the former Pamela J. Glady of Lyndhurst, Ohio. They have two children. He enjoys piano and vocal music, sports.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Charles F. Brush High School, Lyndhurst, Ohio, in 1973; received a bachelor of science degree in physics from Kent State University, Ohio, in 1977, and a master of science in solid state physics from John Carroll University, Ohio, in 1979.

ORGANIZATIONS: American Legion, Kent State University Alumni Association, John Carroll University Alumni Association, Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Graduated Summa Cum Laude from Kent State University. Awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal with one Oak Leaf, the USAF Legion of Merit, the USAF Meritorious Service Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal with one Oak Leaf, the USAF Commendation Medal, and the USAF Achievement Medal with one Oak Leaf Cluster. Distinguished Graduate from the USAF Test Pilot School, Class 83A. Inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame. Awarded four NASA Space Flight Medals, NASA Distinguished Service Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal, Distinguished Alumnus Award, Kent State University, 1997, Alumni Award, John Carroll University, 2002, Diocesan Award, Catholic Diocese of Houston/Galveston 2002, Gagarin Award, National Aeronautic Association, 2003.

EXPERIENCE: From 1979 to 1982, Walz was responsible for analysis of radioactive samples from the Atomic Energy Detection System at the 1155th Technical Operations Squadron, McClellan Air Force Base, California. The subsequent year was spent in study as a Flight Test Engineer at the USAF Test Pilot School, Edwards Air Force Base, California. From January 1984 to June 1987, Walz served as a Flight Test Engineer to the F-16 Combined Test Force at Edwards Air Force Base, where he worked on a variety of F-16C airframe avionics and armament development programs. From July 1987 to June 1990, he served as a Flight Test Manager at Detachment 3, Air Force Flight Test Center.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Walz is a veteran of four space flights, and has logged a total of 231 days in space. He was a mission specialist on STS-51 (1993), was the Orbiter flight engineer (MS-2) on STS-65 (1994), was a mission specialist on STS-79 (1996), and served 196 days in space as flight engineer (FE-1) on ISS Expedition-Four (2001-2002). Carl also served as the Director for the Advanced Capabilities Division in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C. He was responsible for a broad range of activities to include Human Research, Technology Development, Nuclear Power and Propulsion and the Lunar Robotic Exploration Programs to support the Vision for Space Exploration. He retired from NASA on December 5, 2008 to pursue interests in the private sector.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-51 Discovery (September 12-22, 1993). During the mission, the five member crew deployed the U.S. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) with NASA and German scientific experiments aboard. Walz also participated in a 7-hour space walk (EVA) to evaluate tools for the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. The mission was accomplished in 9 days, 22 hours, and 12 minutes.

STS-65 Columbia (July 8-23, 1994). STS-65 flew the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) spacelab module, and carried a crew of seven. During the 15-day flight the crew conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The mission completed 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles, setting a new flight duration record for the Shuttle program.

STS-79 Atlantis (September 16-26, 1996). On STS-79 the six member crew aboard Atlantis docked with the Russian MIR station, delivered food, water, U.S. scientific experiments and Russian equipment, and exchanged NASA long duration crewmembers. During the mission, the Atlantis/Mir complex set a record for docked mass in space. STS-79 was the first flight of the double Spacehab module, and landed at KSC after 10 days 3 hours and 13 minutes.

Expedition 4 (December 5, 2001 to June 19 2002). The Expedition-4 crew launched on December 5, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, STS-108, and docked with the International Space Station on December 7, 2001. During their 196 days in space, the Expedition-4 crew of three (two American astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut) performed flight tests of the station hardware, conducted internal and external maintenance tasks, robotic control tasks, and conducted numerous experiments in a variety of scientific disciplines. Wearing the Russian Orlan spacesuit, Walz logged 6 hours of EVA time with Commander Yury Onufrienko as they continued the outfitting of the Russian-supplied Docking Compartment (DC). In addition, Walz logged 5 hours 52 minutes of EVA time in the U.S. EMU spacesuit in his second spacewalk with flight engineer Dan Bursch, preparing the ISS for the S0 truss, delivered by the STS-110 crew. The Expedition-4 crew also performed a Soyuz relocation from the FGB nadir to the DC nadir hatch to prepare for the arrival of a new Soyuz capsule. The Expedition-4 crew returned to Earth aboard STS-111, with Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on June 19, 2002.




COLONEL ROBERT CABANA
Born: January 23, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Robert D. Cabana (Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Retired)
DIRECTOR, KENNEDY SPACE CENTER

PERSONAL DATA: Born January 23, 1949, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Married to the former Nancy Joan Shimer of Cortland, New York. They have three children, Jeffrey, Christopher and Sarah. He enjoys jogging, cycling, softball, sailing and woodworking.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Washburn High School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1967; received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from the United States Naval Academy in 1971.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow in the Society of Experimental Test Pilots; Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and member of the Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame in 2008. Recipient of The Daughters of the American Revolution Award for the top Marine to complete naval flight training in 1976. Distinguished Graduate, U.S. Naval Test Pilot School. Awarded the De La Vaulx medal by the Federation Aeronautique Internationale in 1994. Personal decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, the National Intelligence Medal of Achievement, two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, two NASA Medals for Outstanding Leadership, two NASA Exceptional Service Medals and four NASA Space Flight Medals.

EXPERIENCE: After graduation from the Naval Academy, Cabana attended the Basic School in Quantico, Virginia, and completed naval flight officer training in Pensacola, Florida, in 1972. He served as an A-6 bombardier/navigator with Marine Air Wings in Cherry Point, North Carolina, and Iwakuni, Japan. He returned to Pensacola in 1975 for pilot training and was designated a naval aviator in September 1976. He was then assigned to the Second Marine Aircraft Wing in Cherry Point, North Carolina, where he flew A-6 Intruders. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in 1981 and served at the Naval Air Test Center in Patuxent River, Maryland, as the A-6 Program Manager, X-29 Advanced Technology Demonstrator Project Officer and as a test pilot for flight systems and ordnance separation testing on A-6 and A-4 series aircraft. Prior to his selection as an astronaut candidate, he served as the Assistant Operations Officer of Marine Aircraft Group Twelve in Iwakuni, Japan. Cabana retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in September 2000.

He has logged more than 7,000 hours in 45 different kinds of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in June 1985, Cabana completed initial astronaut training in July 1986, qualifying for assignment as a pilot on future space shuttle flight crews. His initial assignment was as the Astronaut Office Space Shuttle Flight Software Coordinator until November 1986. At that time, he was assigned as the Deputy Chief of Aircraft Operations for the Johnson Space Center, where he served for two and a half years. He then served as the lead astronaut in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL), where the orbiter's flight software was tested prior to flight. Cabana has served as a Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control during space shuttle missions and as Chief of Astronaut Appearances. Prior to his assignment to command STS-88, Cabana served for three years as the Chief of NASA's Astronaut Office. Following STS-88, Cabana served as the Deputy Director of Flight Crew Operations. After joining the International Space Station Program in October 1999, Cabana served as Manager for International Operations. From August 2001 to September 2002, he served as Director, Human Space Flight Programs, Russia. As NASA's lead representative to the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos) and its contractors, he provided oversight of all human space flight operations, logistics and technical functions, including NASA's mission operations in Korolev and crew training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City. Upon his return to Houston, Cabana was assigned briefly as the Deputy Manager of the International Space Station Program. From November 2002 to March 2004, he served as Director of the Flight Crew Operations Directorate and was responsible for directing the day-to-day activities of the directorate, including the Astronaut Corps and aircraft operations at Ellington Field. He was then assigned as Deputy Director of the Johnson Space Center, where he served for three and a half years. He next served as the Director of the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

A veteran of four space flights, Cabana has logged more than 910 hours in space. He served as pilot on STS-41 (October 6 to October 10, 1990) and STS-53 (December 2 to December 9, 1992) and was mission commander on STS-65 (July 8 to July 23, 1994) and STS-88 (December 4 to December 15, 1998), the first International Space Station assembly mission. Cabana currently serves as the Director of Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-41 Discovery launched on October 6, 1990, from Kennedy Space Center and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on October 10, 1990. During 66 orbits of the Earth, the five-person crew successfully deployed the Ulysses spacecraft, starting the interplanetary probe on its four-year journey, via Jupiter, to investigate the polar regions of the Sun; operated the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet instrument (SSBUV) to map atmospheric ozone levels; activated a controlled “fire in space” experiment (the Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) and conducted numerous other middeck experiments involving radiation measurements, polymer membrane production and microgravity effects on plants.

STS-53 Discovery launched from Kennedy Space Center on December 2, 1992. The crew of five deployed the classified Department of Defense payload DOD-1 and then performed several Military-Man-in-Space and NASA experiments. After completing 115 orbits of the Earth in 175 hours, Discovery landed at Edwards Air Force Base on December 9, 1992.

STS-65 Columbia launched from Kennedy Space Center on July 8, 1994, returning to Florida on July 23, 1994. The crew conducted the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission, utilizing the long Spacelab module in the payload bay. The flight consisted of 82 experiments from 15 countries and six space agencies from around the world. During the record‑setting 15-day flight, the crew conducted experiments that focused on materials and life sciences research in a microgravity environment, paving the way for future operations and cooperation aboard the International Space Station. The mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth in 353 hours and 55 minutes.

STS-88 Endeavour (December 4 to December 15, 1998) was the first International Space Station assembly mission. During the 12-day mission, Unity, the U.S.-built node, was mated with Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Two crew members performed three spacewalks to connect umbilicals and attach tools/hardware in the assembly and outfitting of the station. Additionally, the crew performed the initial activation and first ingress of the International Space Station, preparing it for future assembly missions and full-time occupation. The crew also performed IMAX Cargo Bay Camera (ICBC) operations and deployed two satellites, Mighty Sat 1, built by the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory, and SAC-A, the first successful launch of an Argentine satellite. The mission was accomplished in 185 orbits of the Earth in 283 hours and 18 minutes.




DONALD A. THOMAS
Born: May 6, 1955 in Cleveland, Ohio

Donald A. Thomas (Ph.D.)
NASA ASTRONAUT (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born May 6, 1955, in Cleveland, Ohio. Married to the former Simone Lehmann of Göppingen, Germany. They have one son. He enjoys swimming, biking, camping, flying. His mother, Mrs. Irene M. Thomas, resides in Bloomington, Indiana. Her parents, Margrit and Gerhard Lehmann, reside in Göppingen, Germany.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Cleveland Heights High School, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, in 1973; received a bachelor of science degree in Physics from Case Western Reserve University in 1977, and a master of science degree and a doctorate in Materials Science from Cornell University in 1980 and 1982, respectively. His dissertation involved evaluating the effect of crystalline defects and sample purity on the superconducting properties of niobium.

ORGANIZATIONS: Tau Beta Pi; Association of Space Explorers (ASE).

SPECIAL HONORS: Graduated with Honors from Case Western Reserve University in 1977. Recipient of NASA Sustained Superior Performance Award, 1989. Recipient of 4 NASA Group Achievement Awards, 4 NASA Space Flight Medals, 2 NASA Exceptional Service Medals, and the NASA Distinguished Service Medal.

EXPERIENCE: Following graduation from Cornell University in 1982, Dr. Thomas joined AT&T Bell Laboratories in Princeton, New Jersey, working as a Senior Member of the Technical Staff. His responsibilities there included the development of advanced materials and processes for high density interconnections of semiconductor devices. He was also an adjunct professor in the Physics Department at Trenton State College in New Jersey. He holds two patents and has authored several technical papers. He left AT&T in 1987 to work for Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company in Houston, Texas, where his responsibilities involved reviewing materials used in Space Shuttle payloads. In 1988 he joined NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center as a Materials Engineer. His work involved lifetime projections of advanced composite materials for use on Space Station Freedom. He was also a Principal Investigator for the Microgravity Disturbances Experiment, a middeck crystal growth experiment which flew on STS-32 in January 1990. This experiment investigated the effects of Orbiter and crew-induced disturbances on the growth of crystals in space.

He is a private pilot with over 250 hours in single engine land aircraft and gliders, and over 800 hours flying as mission specialist in NASA T-38 jet aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Thomas became an astronaut in July 1991. Dr. Thomas has served in the Safety, Operations Development, and Payloads Branches of the Astronaut Office. He was CAPCOM (spacecraft communicator) for Shuttle missions STS-47, 52 and 53. From July 1999 to June 2000 he was Director of Operations for NASA at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia. A veteran of four space flights, he has logged over 1,040 hours in space. He was a mission specialist on STS-65 (July 8-23, 1994), STS-70 (July 13-22, 1995), STS-83 (April 4-8, 1997) and STS-94 (July 1-17, 1997). Initially assigned to the ISS Expedition-6 crew, his flight assignment withdrawal resulted from a medical issue affecting long duration space flight qualifications. In his last assignment he served as the International Space Station Program Scientist overseeing NASA experiments performed on the ISS. Dr. Thomas retired from NASA in July 2007 in order to pursue private interests.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-65 Columbia (July 8-23, 1994) set a new flight duration record for the Space Shuttle program. The mission flew the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2). During the 15-day flight the crew conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles in 353 hours and 55 minutes.

STS-70 Discovery (July 13-22, 1995). During the STS-70 mission, Dr. Thomas was responsible for the deployment of the sixth and final Tracking and Data Relay Satellite from the Space Shuttle. Mission duration was 214 hours and 20 minutes, traveling 3.7 million miles in 142 orbits of the Earth.

STS-83 Columbia (April 4-8, 1997). The STS-83 Microgravity Science Laboratory ( MSL-1) Spacelab mission, was cut short because of problems with one of the Shuttle's three fuel cell power generation units. Mission duration was 95 hours and 12 minutes, traveling 1.5 million miles in 63 orbits of the Earth.

STS-94 Columbia (July 1-17, 1997), was a re-flight of the Microgravity Science Laboratory ( MSL-1) Spacelab mission, and focused on materials and combustion science research in microgravity. Mission duration was 376 hours and 45 minutes, traveling 6.3 million miles in 251 orbits of the Earth.




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