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SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY - STS - 42 CREW - COMMEMORATIVE ENVELOPE SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: ULF MERBOLD, STEVE OSWALD, COLONEL DAVID C. HILMERS, COLONEL RONALD J. GRABE, ROBERTA BONDAR, WILLIAM "BILL" READDY - HFSID 296172

 
SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY: STS-42 MISSION
Commemorative Envelope signed by all seven crew members: Grabe, Oswald, Thagard, Hilmers, Readdy, Bondar and Merbold
Commemorative Envelope signed: "Roberta Bondar", "Dave Hilmer", "Merbold", "Ron Grabe", "Steve Oswald", "Bill Readdy", "Norm E. Thagard", 6½x3½. Envelope postmarked Kennedy Space Center, January 22, 1992. Space shuttle mission STS-42, the 45th orbital flight and the fourteenth flight of Discovery, was launched from Kennedy Space Center on January 22, 1992 and returned to Edwards Air Force Base on January 30. This flight carried a Spacelab module, the International Microgravity Laboratory, and the crew divided into Red and Blue teams for experiments on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity. Other microgravity experiments involved shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit flies and bacteria. The crew was composed of Commander RONALD J. GRABE; Pilot STEPHEN S. OSWALD; Mission Specialists NORMAN E. THAGARD, DAVID C. HILMERS AND WILLIAM F. READDY; AND Payload Specialists ROBERTA L. BONDAR and ULF D. MERBOLD. Joining five US citizens in the international crew were Canadian Bondar and German Merbold (of the European Space Agency). "Dave Hilmer" lightly beaded but legible. Otherwise, fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SPACE SHUTTLE DISCOVERY - STS - 42 CREW   WILLIAM READDY   ULF MERBOLD   STEVE OSWALD   COLONEL DAVID C. HILMERS   COLONEL RONALD J. GRABE   ROBERTA BONDAR  


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WILLIAM READDY
Born: January 24, 1952 in Quonset Point, Rhode Island

William F. Readdy
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born January 24, 1952, in Quonset Point, Rhode Island, but considers McLean, Virginia, to be his hometown. Married to Colleen Nevius. They have two sons and a daughter. He enjoys sailing, racquet sports, flying, and reading.

EDUCATION: Graduated from McLean High School, McLean, Virginia, in 1970; bachelor of science degree in aerospace engineering (with honors) from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1974. Distinguished graduate, U.S. Naval Test Pilot School 1980.

ORGANIZATIONS: Fellow, Society of Experimental Test Pilots. Member, Association of Space Explorers, International Academy of Astronautics, U.S. Naval Institute, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Naval Order of the United States. Board member, National Aeronautic Association.

SPECIAL HONORS: Recipient of the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, three NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals, two NASA Exceptional Service Medals, three NASA Space Flight Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Navy Expeditionary medal, two National Defense Service Medals, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, and various unit and service awards. U.S. Naval Test Pilot School Instructor of the Year (1984). NASA Space Flight Safety Award. Federation Aeronautique Internationale awards include: the Kamarov Diploma (STS-51), the De La Vaulx Medal (STS-79) and a World Record Certificate (STS-79).

EXPERIENCE: Readdy graduated from Annapolis in 1974, and earned his wings as a naval aviator. Following fleet training in the A-6 “Intruder” at NAS Oceana, Virginia, he joined Attack Squadron Eighty-five aboard the USS Forrestal deployed to the North Atlantic and Mediterranean from 1976 until 1980. Upon completion of the Naval Test Pilot School, he served as project test pilot on a variety of programs at Strike Aircraft Test Directorate. Following a tour as a test pilot instructor, he reported in 1984 to the USS Coral Sea, on Caribbean and Mediterranean deployments. In 1986 Readdy transferred into the Naval Reserve to join NASA and served as an instructor pilot and unit commander until his naval retirement in August 2000. He has logged 7,000 flying hours in over 60 types of fixed wing and helicopters and over 550 carrier landings.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Readdy joined NASA's Johnson Space Center in October 1986 as a research pilot at Ellington Field, Houston, Texas, where he served as program manager for the highly-modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. He was selected as an astronaut in the 1987 Group. He served in numerous support roles including: Training Officer; Safety Officer; Operations Development Branch Chief; NASA Director of Operations, Star City, Russia; Stafford Task Force; and the first manager of Space Shuttle Program Development charged with upgrading the Space Shuttle. He served at NASA Headquarters as Associate Administrator, Space Operations Mission Directorate with oversight for the Kennedy, Johnson, Marshall and Stennis Space Centers as well as programmatic oversight for International Space Station, Space Shuttle, Space Communications and Space Launch Vehicles. Readdy recently chaired the Space Flight Leadership Council charged with oversight of NASA's successful Space Shuttle Return to Flight STS-114 mission. Readdy retired from NASA in October 2005 and formed Discovery Partners International, an aerospace consulting firm, located in Arlington, Virginia, where he serves as managing partner.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: Readdy is a veteran pilot astronaut with three space flights, STS-42 (January 22-30, 1992), STS-51 (September 12-22, 1993) and STS-79 (September 16-26, 1996). Readdy has logged over 672 hours in space.




ULF MERBOLD
Born: June 20, 1941 in Greiz, Germany

Personal data

Born in Greiz, Germany, 20 June 1941 Ulf is married and has two children. He enjoys skiing, glider flying and piano playing.

Education

Ulf Merbold graduated from Stuttgart University in 1968 with a diploma in physics. In 1976 he received a doctorate in Sciences (Dr.rer.nat.).

Special honours

Ulf Merbold has received numerous awards, including the First Class Order of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Order of Merit of the States of Baden-Württemberg and Nordrhein-Westfalen, the Haley Space Flight Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the USSR Pilot-Cosmonaut V.M. Komarov diploma of the International Aeronautical Federation, and the distinction for scientific achievement in Air and Space Medicine from the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin.

In 1983 he received the Flight Achievement Award of the American Astronautical Society and the "Order of Friendship" from President Yeltsin of the Russian Federation in 1995. The following year Ulf Merbold was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering (Dr.-Ing. h.c.) by the Rheinisch-Westfalische Technische Hochschule.

Experience

After university, Ulf Merbold joined the Max-Planck-Institute for Metals Research in Stuttgart, first on the basis of a scholarship of the Max Planck Society and later as a staff member, where he studied state and low temperature physics, in particular experimental investigations of lattice defects in body-centered cubic metals.

In 1977, Ulf was pre-selected by ESA as a Payload Specialist for the first flight of the European-built Spacelab laboratory on the US Space Shuttle (Spacelab 1). A year later he was nominated as one of the three Payload Specialists for the mission and in 1982 was selected for flight by the ESA Director General, following a recommendation of the Principal Investigators (the scientists involved in the mission).

Ulf Merbold became the first non-American to fly on the Space Shuttle during the STS-9 mission (28 November to 8 December 1983). In 1984 he was involved in the Space Shuttle Spacelab German D-1 mission, as both back-up Payload Specialist and Crew Interface Coordinator (CIC).

Merbold transferred to the European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, in 1986 to support ESA in the planning of Columbus, the European laboratory for the International Space Station.

He was appointed Head of the DLR (German Aerospace Research Establishment) Astronaut Office in 1987 and, on the basis of a secondment to DLR, led the German astronauts and supported the preparation of the D2 mission. In December 1988 he was nominated as ESA Payload Specialist candidate for the International Microgravity Laboratory mission (IML-1) on the Space Shuttle.

The IML-1 (STS-42) training programme started in April 1989 and the following January he was selected to fly as Payload Specialist on the mission which took place between 22 and 31 January 1992. During the second German D2 mission from 26 April to 6 May 1993, Ulf Merbold was Science Coordinator at the Mission Control Center in Germany.

In August 1993, after preparatory courses at the European Astronaut Centre (EAC), he started training at TsPK (Cosmonauts Training Centre) in Star City near Moscow. He was selected for flight (Crew 1) for ESA's Euromir 94 mission and became the first ESA astronaut to fly on the Russian space station Mir, carrying out a 32-day mission between 3 October and 4 November, 1994.

Between 1999 and 2004 Ulf Merbold was responsible for the Utilisation Promotion Management in the Microgravity Promotion Division of the ESA Directorate of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, at ESTEC, Noordwijk, the Netherlands. Merbold holds a commercial pilots license (CPL2) with Instrument Rating, as well as an Acrobatic license, and has logged more than 3000 hours as Pilot in Command.

Spaceflight Experience

Ulf Merbold flew on STS-9 (28 November to 8 December 1983) and became the first non-American to fly on a Space Shuttle mission. The primary objective of this mission was the verification of Spacelab in orbit and the execution of 72 highly sophisticated scientific experiments.

He was ESA's Payload Specialist on STS-42 (22 January - 31 January 1992), the International Microgravity Laboratory mission (IML-1) on the Space Shuttle. As a member of the payload crew he was primarily responsible for the 55 scientific experiments on the flight.

Merbold was selected to fly with ESA's Euromir 94 mission (3 October - 4 November 1994) to the Russian Space Station MIR. He was the first ESA astronaut to fly on a Russian mission and performed a 32-day mission as Research Cosmonaut. He was responsible for the execution of 28 European experiments.




STEVE OSWALD
Born: June 30, 1951 in Seattle, Washington

Stephen S. Oswald
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born June 30, 1951, in Seattle, Washington, but considers Bellingham, Washington, to be his hometown. Married to the former Diane K. Kalklosch of Fullerton, California. They have three children, Monique, Janna, and Scott.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Bellingham High School, Bellingham, Washington, in 1969; received a bachelor of science degree in aerospace engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1973.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, the Association of Space Explorers, the Naval Reserve Association, the Distinguished Eagle Scout Association, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

AWARDS: Recipient of the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal (2), the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal (2), the NASA Space Flight Medal (3), and various service awards.

EXPERIENCE: Oswald graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1973, and was designated a naval aviator in September 1974. Following training in the A-7 aircraft, he flew aboard the USS Midway from 1975 through 1977. In 1978, Oswald attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Maryland. Upon graduation, he remained at the Naval Air Test Center conducting flying qualities, performance, and propulsion flight tests on the A-7 and F/A-18 aircraft through 1981. Following tours as an F/A-18 flight instructor and as a catapult officer aboard the USS Coral Sea, Oswald resigned from active Navy duty and joined Westinghouse Electric Corporation as a civilian test pilot. Oswald is a captain in the Naval Reserve, currently assigned to the Office of Naval Research. He has logged 7,000+ flight hours in over 40 different aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Oswald joined NASA in November 1984 as an aerospace engineer and instructor pilot and was selected as an astronaut candidate in June 1985. His technical assignments within the Astronaut Office have included: flight crew representative to Kennedy Space Center; flight software testing with the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory; crew representative to the Marshall Space Flight Center on solid rocket booster redesign; and spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) in the Mission Control Center during Space Shuttle missions. He was also the Chief of the Operations Development Branch within the Astronaut Office and served as Assistant Director of Engineering at Johnson Space Center.

Oswald has piloted two missions aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery: STS-42, the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 mission, flown in January 1992, and STS-56, the second Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-2) mission, flown in April 1993. Oswald commanded STS-67, the second flight of the Astro observatory (Astro II), which flew on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in March, 1995. This mission established a mission duration record for Space Shuttle at 17 days. With the completion of his third space flight, Oswald has logged over 33 days in space.

After STS-67, Oswald was assigned to NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC as Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Operations. In this capacity, he was responsible for Space Shuttle, Expendable Launch Vehicles, and Space Communications for the Agency. After nearly two and a half years in Washington, Oswald returned to the Astronaut Office in July 1998.

Oswald retired from NASA in January 2000.



Film Credits
1994 Destiny in Space (in person)


COLONEL DAVID C. HILMERS
Born: January 28, 1950 in Clinton, Iowa

David C. Hilmers (Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born January 28, 1950, in Clinton, Iowa, but considers DeWitt, Iowa, to be his hometown. Married to the former Lynn Beneke of Vinton, Iowa. Two grown sons. Recreational interests include playing playing the piano, gardening, electronics, spending time with his family, and all types of sports. His father, Paul C. Hilmers, lives in Clinton, Iowa, and his mother, Matilda Hilmers, lives in DeWitt, Iowa. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leland Beneke, reside in Vinton, Iowa.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Central Community High School in DeWitt, Iowa, in 1968; received a bachelor of arts degree in mathematics (Summa Cum Laude) from Cornell College in 1972, a master of science degree in electrical engineering (with distinction) in 1977, and the degree of electrical engineer from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1978.

ORGANIZATIONS: Phi Beta Kappa, and Eta Kappa Nu.

SPECIAL HONORS: Named Outstanding Scholar-Athlete, Midwest Conference (1971); graduated Summa Cum Laude from Cornell College (1972); awarded an NCAA Post-Graduate Fellowship (1972); named to Phi Beta Kappa and named Outstanding Athlete, Cornell College (1972). Recipient of three NASA Exceptional Service Medals, three NASA Space Flight Medals, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Haley Space Flight Award for 1988, and the American Astronautical Society Flight Achievement Award for 1988. Awarded the Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal, and the Meritorious Service Medal.

EXPERIENCE: Hilmers entered active duty with the United States Marine Corps in July 1972. On completing Marine Corps Basic School and Naval Flight Officer School, he was assigned to VMA(AW)-121 at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, flying the A-6 Intruder as a bombardier-navigator. In 1975, he became an air liaison officer with the 1st Battalion, 2d Marines, stationed with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1978 and was later assigned to the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing in Iwakuni, Japan. He was stationed with the 3d Marine Aircraft Wing in El Toro, California, at the time of his selection by NASA.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Hilmers was selected a NASA astronaut in July 1980, and completed the initial training period in August 1981. In 1983 he was selected as a member of the -launch ready standby crew. His early NASA assignments have included work on upper stages such as PAM, IUS, and Centaur, as well as Shuttle software verification at the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL). In addition, he was the Astronaut Office training coordinator, worked on various Department of Defense payloads, served as a spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) at Mission Control for STS-41D, STS-41G, STS-51A, STS-51C and STS-51D, worked Space Station issues for the Astronaut Office, and served as head of the Mission Development Branch within the Astronaut Office. In May 1985 he was named to the crew of STS-61F which was to deploy the Ulysses spacecraft on an interplanetary trajectory using a Centaur upper stage. This mission was to have flown in May 1986, but the Shuttle Centaur project was terminated in July 1986, and Hilmers then worked in the areas of ascent abort development, payload safety, and shuttle on-board software. During 1987 he was involved in training for STS-26 and in flight software development.

A veteran of four space flights, he has logged over 493 hours in space. He served as a mission specialist on STS-51J (October 3-7, 1985), STS-26 (September 29 to October 3, 1988), STS-36 (February 28 to March 4, 1990), and STS-42 (January 22-30, 1992).

Hilmers retired from NASA in October 1992, and is currently enrolled as a medical student at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS 51-J Atlantis, a classified Department of Defense mission, launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on October 3, 1985. This was the maiden voyage of the Orbiter Atlantis. Hilmers had prime responsibility for a number of on-orbit activities during the mission. After 98 hours of orbital operations, Atlantis landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on October 7, 1985.

STS-26 Discovery, the first flight to be flown after the Challenger accident, was launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on September 29, 1988. During the four-day mission, the crew successfully deployed the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-C), which was subsequently carried to orbit by the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket. They also operated eleven mid-deck experiments. Discovery completed 64 orbits of the Earth before landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on October 3, 1988.

STS-36 Atlantis launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on February 28, 1990. This mission carried Department of Defense payloads and a number of secondary payloads. After 72 orbits of the Earth, the STS-36 mission concluded with a lakebed landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on March 4, 1990, after traveling 1.87 million miles.

STS-42 Discovery launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on January 22, 1992. Fifty five major experiments conducted in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 module were provided by investigators from eleven countries, and represented a broad spectrum of scientific disciplines. During 128 orbits of the Earth, the STS-42 crew accomplished the mission's primary objective of investigating the effects of microgravity on materials processing and life sciences. In this unique laboratory in space, crew members worked around-the-clock in two shifts. Experiments investigated the microgravity effects on the growth of protein and semiconductor crystals. Biological experiments on the effects of zero gravity on plants, tissues, bacteria, insects and human vestibular response were also conducted. This eight-day mission culminated in a landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on January 30, 1992.




COLONEL RONALD J. GRABE
Born: June 13, 1945 in New York City, New York

Ronald J. Grabe (Colonel, U.S. Air Force, Retired)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born June 13, 1945, in New York, New York. Married to the former Lynn O'Keefe of Ottawa, Canada. Ron has two daughters and he and Lynn have a son. Recreational interests include skiing, wind surfing, and racquet sports.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Stuyvesant High School, New York, New York, in 1962, received a bachelor of science degree in engineering science from the United States Air Force Academy in 1966; studied aeronautics as a Fulbright Scholar at the Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt, West Germany, in 1967.

SPECIAL HONORS: The Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal with 7 Oak Leaf Clusters, the Air Force Meritorious Service Medal, the Liethen-Tittle Award (for Outstanding Student at the USAF Test Pilot School), the Royal Air Force Cross, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and NASA Space Flight Medals.

EXPERIENCE: Upon graduating from the Air Force Academy in 1966, Grabe went to Darmstadt, West Germany, as a Fulbright Scholar. He returned to the States in 1967 to complete pilot training at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. He subsequently flew F-100 aircraft with the 27th Tactical Fighter Wing at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, and in 1969 was assigned as an F-100 pilot with the 3d Tactical Fighter Wing at Bien Hoa Air Base in the Republic of Vietnam where he flew 200 combat missions. In 1970, he was reassigned to the 27th Tactical Fighter Wing at Cannon Air Force Base to fly F-100 and F-111 aircraft. He participated in the operational test and evaluation of the weapons system of the F-111D aircraft. Grabe attended the USAF Test Pilot School in 1974 and, upon graduating in 1975, was assigned to the Air Force Flight Test Center as a test pilot for the A-7 and F-111. He was the program manager and chief project pilot for the Air Force's digital flight control system for tactical fighters (DIGITAC) evaluation. He later served as an exchange test pilot with the Royal Air Force at Boscombe Down, United Kingdom, from 1976 to 1979. During this tour of duty, he served as the chief project pilot for the Royal Air Force Harrier and the Royal Navy Sea Harrier. He was an instructor at the USAF Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California, when advised of his selection by NASA.

He has logged more than 5,500 hours flying time.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Grabe became a NASA astronaut in August 1981. He has served as a chief verification pilot for STS-3 and STS-4 entry guidance, navigation and control simulation testing; as the Deputy Manager for Operations Integration, Space Shuttle Program Office; and subsequently as the Chief of Training within the Astronaut Office. A veteran of four space flights, Grabe served as pilot on STS 51-J (October 3-7, 1985) and STS-30 (May 4-8, 1989), and was the mission commander on STS-42 (January 22-30, 1992) and STS-57 (June 21 to July 1,1993). Grabe has logged over 627 hours in space. Effective April 11, 1994, Grabe left NASA and the Air Force to join Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-51J, the second Space Shuttle Department of Defense mission, launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on October 3, 1985. This was the maiden voyage of the Atlantis, the final Orbiter in the Shuttle fleet. After 98 hours of orbital operations, Atlantis landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on October 7, 1985. Mission duration was 97 hours, 14 minutes, 38 seconds.

STS-30 Atlantis launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on May 4, 1989. During the four-day mission, the crew successfully deployed the Magellan Venus-exploration spacecraft, the first U.S. planetary science mission launched since 1978, and the first planetary probe to be deployed from the Shuttle. Magellan arrived at Venus in mid-1990, and mapped over 95% of the surface of Venus. Magellan has been one of NASA's most successful scientific missions and continues to operate today gaining information about the Venetian atmosphere and magnetic field. In addition, crew members also worked on secondary payloads involving fluid research in general, chemistry, and electrical storm studies. Following 64 orbits of the Earth, the STS-30 mission concluded with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 8, 1989. Mission duration was 96 hours, 57 minutes, 35 seconds.

STS-42 Discovery launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on January 22, 1992. Fifty-five major experiments conducted in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 module were provided by investigators from eleven countries, and represented a broad spectrum of scientific disciplines. During 128 orbits of the Earth, the seven-person crew accomplished the mission's primary objective of investigating the effects of microgravity on materials processing and life sciences. In this unique laboratory in space, the crew worked around-the-clock in two shifts. Experiments investigated the microgravity effects on the growth of protein and semiconductor crystals. Biological experiments on the effects of zero gravity on plants, tissues, bacteria, insects and human vestibular response were also conducted. This eight-day mission culminated in a landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on January 30, 1992. Mission duration was 193 hours, 14 minutes, 45 seconds.

STS-57 Endeavour launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on June 21, 1993. The primary mission of this flight was the retrieval of the European Retrievable Carrier satellite (EURECA). Additionally, STS-57 featured the first flight of the Spacehab, a commercially provided middeck augmentation module for the conduct of microgravity experiments. Spacehab carried 22 individual flight experiments in materials processing and human factors. A spacewalk was conducted on this flight as part of an ongoing program to evaluate extravehicular activity (EVA) techniques for future missions. The Space Shuttle Endeavour landed at the Kennedy Space Center on July 1, 1993, after 10 days on orbit. Mission duration was 239 hours, 45 minutes.




ROBERTA BONDAR
Born: December 4, 1945 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada

Roberta Bondar is Canada's first female astronaut and the first neurologist in space. Following more than a decade as NASA's head of space medicine, Bondar became a consultant and speaker in the business, scientific, and medical communities.
 
Bondar has received many honours including the Order of Canada, the Order of Ontario, the NASA Space Medal, over 22 honorary degrees and induction into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.



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