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SUSAN B. ANTHONY - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 03/28/1900 CO-SIGNED BY: SAMUEL EBERLEY GROSS - HFSID 288316

 

SUSAN B. ANTHONY
Letter to Chicago real estate develop Samuel E. Gross, praising his wife's appearance at a Washington, D.C. event held in honor of Anthony's eightieth birthday. She has added a handwritten postscript, remembering to thank him for a gift.
Typed Letter signed: "Susan B. Anthony", 1 page, 8¼x11. Rochester, N.Y., 1900 March 28. To S. E. Gross, Chicago, Illinois. In full: "I am looking over my jewels received on February 15. Just now they are in the shape of telegrams, a huge pile of which I have before me, yours among them. It was lovely of you to send me that reminder that you were in spirit, as well as by representation of your 'Maud' with us in the festivities of that birthday. I wish you could have seen how splendidly Mrs. Gross acted her part all the afternoon and evening. Not one of the three thousand women who passed through the Corcoran Art Gallery could over-top that lady's elegant costume. I think Missouri and Illinois rather took the lead in fine clothes. My nephew's wife, Mrs. Arthur A. Mosher, of New York now, but formerly of St Louis, Missouri, stood almost even with my best lady-lover from Illinois. It was too bad, Mr. Gross, that you did not come to Washington, and so help to swell the crowd that day. I hope you are well, and Mrs. Gross is well also. That the world may go well with both now and evermore is the wish of your sincere friend" [signature] P.S. Oh yes - I am in possession of a very pretty spectacle case to hang at the belt. Thanks for that also." Accompanied by a letter from Gross to Anthony dated April 17, 1900, marked duplicate but bearing his ink signature (S. E. Gross"). Gross replies diplomatically to a separate request from Anthony that he introduce a resolution at the annual meeting of the Sons of the American Revolution. In part: "... In regard to the petition which you desire brought before the Congress of the Sons of the American Revolution at their annual meeting, I have to say that I shall lay it, if agreeable to you, before the Executive Committee, which meets at the time immediately preceding the meeting of the society, and if it should receive sufficient approval, or be regarded as possible to receive favorable action from the society assembled, it will be presented for their action; and if it should not seem possible to effect its adoption, I assume the cause would not be advanced by having it formally presented, and you would not care to have it done. As you are aware, I shall be glad to do anything I can personally in the matter. ..." SUSAN B. ANTHONY (1820-1906) campaigned tirelessly for the abolition of slavery, for temperance (not prohibition), the eight-hour day and other improvements in the condition of labor. Above all, she devoted her life to the struggle for women's rights, including full property rights, equal pay, coeducation and the right to vote. With Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Anthony campaigned in Western states for women's suffrage, securing this right for the first time in Wyoming in 1869. In 1872, she was arrested and, in 1873, tried and convicted (by the judge's instruction to the jury) of the crime of voting. Anthony, who was not imprisoned, refused to pay her fine. SAMUEL E. GROSS (1843-1913), a Chicago real estate mogul specializing in suburban developments was known as "Sell-a-Million Sam." He successfully sued French playwright Edmond Rostand, convincing a US federal court that Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" was plagiarized from Gross' "The Merchant Prince of Cornville". Gross declared bankruptcy in 1908, a result his lawyers attributed to "unwise speculation." Gross was at one time President General of the Sons of the American Revolution. These letters are from the women's history collection of Judith Kaplan, a successful Florida business woman and a director of the Museum of Women's History in Washington, D.C. Toned and creased. Staple holes at top edge. Multiple mailing folds. Notch at center left edge. Otherwise, fine condition.


For more documents by these signers click the names below:

SUSAN B. ANTHONY   SAMUEL EBERLEY GROSS  


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SUSAN B. ANTHONY
Born: February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts
Died: March 13, 1906 in Rochester, New York





SAMUEL EBERLEY GROSS
Born: Circa 1843
Died: October 24, 1913 in Battle Creek, Michigan





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