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THE STOOGE MOVIE CAST - DOCUMENT SIGNED CO-SIGNED BY: FRANCES E. BAVIER, DEAN MARTIN, POLLY BERGEN, HAL B. WALLIS, JERRY LEWIS, OSCAR RUDOLPH, MARION MARSHALL, EDDIE MAYEHOFF, ELWOOD ULLMAN, CHARLES EVANS, DANIEL L. FAPP, DON McKAY, DICK BRANDON - HFSID 275003

THE STOOGE MOVIE CAST Featuring the actors and production crew of Jerry Lewis' favorite Martin & Lewis film. Document signed by the cast: "Dean Martin", "Jerry Lewis (Ha-So!)", "Polly Bergen", "Marion Marshall", "Ed.

Sale Price $2,240.00

Reg. $2,800.00

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THE STOOGE MOVIE CAST Featuring the actors and production crew of Jerry Lewis' favorite Martin & Lewis film. Document signed by the cast: "Dean Martin", "Jerry Lewis (Ha-So!)", "Polly Bergen", "Marion Marshall", "Ed. Mayehoff", "Frances Bavier", "Charles Evans" ; and by the production team: "Hal Wallis" (producer), "Elwood Ullman" (screenwriter), "Dan L. Fapp" (cinematographer), "Oscar Rudolph" (assistant director), "Don McKay" (sound technician), and "Dick Brandon" (property manager), 1p, 9x12¼. No place, circa 1951. The Stooge, filmed (as noted on the document) between February 19 and March 24, 1951, was not released until 1952. It starred Dean Martin as a struggling singer who becomes successful only after teamed up with the comedian played by Jerry Lewis. (No wonder it's said to be a favorite of Lewis.) Polly Bergen and Marion Marshall played the love interests. After meeting in Atlantic City in 1946, singer MARTIN (1917-1995) and comedian LEWIS (1926-) formed a partnership. With Martin singing and Lewis clowning, the team enjoyed enormous popularity in live performances, on television and in 16 films before they broke up in 1956. Each pursued a successful career thereafter, Martin as a singer, actor, TV host and nightclub entertainer; Lewis as a comedian and the host of muscular dystrophy telethons. Singer-actress BERGEN was dissatisfied with the roles Hollywood offered her in ten films of the early 1950s, including three Martin and Lewis vehicles, so she left for New York to pursue a stage career and record several albums of popular standards (most notably Bergen Sings Morgan and The Party's Over (1957). She returned to film in 1962, beginning with Cape Fear (1962). Bergen has authored three books, assisted many charities, and promoted her own lines of cosmetic and jewelry products. Stage, screen and television actress Frances BAVIER (1902-1989) is best known for her role as Aunt Bea Taylor on The Andy Griffith Show, which was televised on CBS from 1960-1968. Marion MARSHALL (b. 1930) had her biggest screen roles in the early 1950s. In That's My Boy, she was again paired with Polly Bergen as the respective sweethearts of Martin and Lewis. Eddie MAYEHOFF (1909-1992), a comic actor and former bandleader, starred in a 1955 TV series, That's My Boy, based on the 1951 Martin & Lewis film in which he had also appeared. Veteran actor Charles EVANS played supporting roles in many films from 1945 until the early 1960s. He appeared in another Martin & Lewis vehicle in 1952, Jumping Jacks, and appeared in many B science fiction yarns late in his career. Hal WALLIS (1898-1986) rose from office boy, forced by poverty to leave school at 14, to become one of Hollywood's most successful and respected producers. Working at Warner Bros. until 1944, he was an independent producer thereafter. His greatest triumph was Casablanca (1942), but he produced one movie blockbuster after another from Little Caesar (1930) to Rooster Cogburn (1975). The Academy of Motion Pictures twice awarded him the Irving Thalberg Award.  B-movie screenwriter Elwood ULLMAN, active 1941-1968, wrote many scripts for the Three Stooges. Daniel FAPP (1904-1986), who had worked his way up from Paramount lab assistant in the 1930s, won an Oscar for his cinematography (West Side Story, 1961) and was nominated for six more between 1958 and 1959: Desire Under the Elms, The Five Pennies, One, Two, Three, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, Ice Station Zebra and Marooned. A supporting actor in previous decades, Assistant Director Oscar RUDOLPH (1911-1991) would soon be directing his own films, finding his greatest success in TV sitcoms of the 1960s (My Favorite Martian, The Flying Nun). Further research might reveal whether Dick BRANDON, working for Paramount pictures here as property manager, was the same Dick Brandon (b. 1919) who had appeared as a child actor in many silent movies for the same studio in the 1920s, retiring from acting at age 13. Previously authenticated by PSA/DNA.

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