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THOMAS J. WATSON SR. - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 05/29/1956 - HFSID 166981

LS: "Thos J. Watson", 1p, 7¾x10½. New York, N.Y., 1956 May 29. To Dr. David B. Steinman, New York. In full: "I want to tell you how delighted I was recently in having the opportunity to review your article, 'Beauty in Bridges'.…"

Sale Price $1,487.50

Reg. $1,750.00

Condition: Lightly creased, Lightly soiled, otherwise fine condition Add to watchlist:
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THE CREATIVE FORCE BEHIND THE SUCCESS OF IBM CONGRATULATES FAMED BRIDGE BUILDER DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN ON AN ARTICLE

THOMAS J. WATSON, SR.
TLS: "Thos J. Watson", 1p, 7¾x10½. New York, N.Y., 1956 May 29. To Dr. David B. Steinman, New York. In full: "I want to tell you how delighted I was recently in having the opportunity to review your article, 'Beauty in Bridges'. Your observations regarding bridge construction, particularly the basic philosophy of beauty as a quality of engineering in this field, were most interesting. I know your achievements are a source of great satisfaction to you, and that a great measure of such satisfaction comes directly from your success in applying this philosophy to your life's work. Senor Zevi, Editor of 'L'architettura', should be congratulated on the excellent presentation he gave your article as well as for the fine illustrations. With kindest regards and all best wishes, I remain Sincerely yours." Signed just three weeks before Watson, the man who shaped IBM into the world's dominating manufacturer of business machines, suffered a heart attack and died on June 19, 1956 at the age of 82. At the time of this letter, both he and his correspondent, friend and renowned bridge builder, David Barnard Steinman (1886-1960), were in the twilight of their careers. A long time supporter of the arts, Watson reveals his appreciation of Steinman's philosophy that "Beauty in Bridges" should be a consideration in bridge design. Seasoned by 15 years of sales experience at the National Cash Register Company (1898-1913), where he first introduced his motto "Think", THOMAS JOHN WATSON, SR. (1874-1956) joined the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company as President in 1914. Ten years later, that company changed its name to the International Business Machines Corporation and, while under his leadership, forged a worldwide command of the business-machine industry. As President of IBM, Watson unleashed an aggressive two-fold plan consisting of innovative research and development and the formation of a highly motivated, well-trained sales force. Exercising his IBM slogan, "World Peace Through World Trade", Watson built bridges of his own by encouraging his forces to expand internationally, while being one of the first industrialists to offer his employees wide-ranging benefits. Watson's regard for his workers and his efforts toward world peace (he was elected President of the International Chamber of Commerce) earned him great respect worldwide. For the conscientious and limited-profit production of military munitions by IBM during WWII, Watson was honored by President Harry S Truman with the Congressional Medal of Merit (1947). Through unwavering discipline, diplomacy and fairness, Watson guided IBM into an industrial empire with unprecedented success. DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN, who earned a doctorate in engineering from Columbia University in addition to his honorary doctorate of science, designed over 400 bridges during his accomplished career. Among his designs are the Henry Hudson Bridge in New York, the Sydney Harbour Bridge in Australia and the wondrous Mackinac Bridge in Michigan. His studies of wind velocity and airflow led to a more feasible and sturdy design for future construction of aerodynamic bridges. In 1948, he supervised the renovation of the Brooklyn Bridge, including the widening of the roadway and the reinforcement of its trusses. Steinman's books, including Suspension Bridges: The Aerodynamic Problem and Its Solution (1954) and Miracle Bridge at Mackinac (1957), document his achievements and exist as valuable bridge-building resources. Lightly creased with folds, light horizontal fold at the upper loops of the "h", "J" and "W" of signature. Lightly soiled at upper portion, tackhead-size stain above date. Receipt-stamp at lower right margin. Overall, fine condition. Framed in the Gallery of History style: 32x23.

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