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WENDELL L. WILLKIE - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 07/08/1942 - HFSID 315455

WENDELL WILLKIE Rare signature of the 1940 Republican Presidential candidate, in a short letter alluding to intra-party politics. His return address brings to mind a famous gaffe from the 1940 campaign. Typed Letter signed: "Wendell L. Willkie", 1 page, 6x8¼. 15 Broad Street, New York, 1942 July 8. To Mrs.

Sale Price $180.00

Reg. $200.00

Condition: fine condition
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WENDELL WILLKIE
Rare signature of the 1940 Republican Presidential candidate, in a short letter alluding to intra-party politics. His return address brings to mind a famous gaffe from the 1940 campaign.
Typed Letter signed: "Wendell L. Willkie", 1 page, 6x8¼. 15 Broad Street, New York, 1942 July 8. To Mrs. Edwin C. Welch, Ballston Spa, New York. In full: "That is a very interesting picture you gave me on what is going on up in Saratoga these days before the Convention. Many thanks for writing. All best wishes to you. Cordially yours". Wendell Willkie (1892-1944), the Republican Presidential nominee in 1940, was a corporate lawyer and former Democrat who had never held public office. As President of the Commonwealth and Southern Corporation, an energy company, Willkie was alarmed by President Roosevelt's public power initiative, the Tennessee Valley Authority, which he considered an unwarranted government infringement on private enterprise. He emerged as a forceful opponent of the President, whom he had previously supported. Lacking strong party connections but with much favorable press coverage, Willkie was the "dark horse" winner of the Republican nomination in 1940. Willkie actually supported many New Deal programs, including Social Security, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Wagner Labor Relations Act. An internationalist at heart, he waffled on foreign policy during the campaign to retain the support of isolationist Republicans. Willkie lost the election to Roosevelt 449-82 electoral votes, but secured nearly 6 million more votes that Alf Landon had received in 1936. During World War II, President Roosevelt employed Willkie on diplomatic missions. Willkie wrote a book, One World (1943), fully embracing international involvement. When he wrote this letter, Willkie - who still hoped for another White House bid in 1944 - must have been eyeing Republican rival Thomas E. Dewey, who was re-nominated at Saratoga and re-elected to a second term as New York Governor in 1942. Dewey, not Willkie, would be the Republican Presidential nominee in 1944 (and 1948). This letterhead brings to mind a famous Willkie "gaffe" from the Presidential campaign, his indignant reply, "I am not a Wall Street lawyer! My office is on Broad Street!" Multiple folds. Corners lightly worn and creased. Small stain on right margin. Slightly toned. Fine condition.

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