loading..

WILLIAM L. LAURENCE - TYPESCRIPT SIGNED - HFSID 290463

WILLIAM L. LAURENCE His vivid, 2-page eyewitness description of the atomic explosion at Nagasaki Typescript signed: William Laurence", 2 pages, 8½x11. Titled "Nagasaki," this is an excerpt from his book Men and Atoms (1959).

Sale Price $272.00

Reg. $320.00

Condition: fine condition
PSA / JSA Authentication Guarantee
Free U.S. Shipping
Chat now or call 800-425-5379

WILLIAM L. LAURENCE
His vivid, 2-page eyewitness description of the atomic explosion at Nagasaki
Typescript signed: William Laurence", 2 pages, 8½x11. Titled "Nagasaki," this is an excerpt from his book Men and Atoms (1959). Lithuanian-born American journalist William Leonard Laurence (1888-1977), born Leid Wolf Siew in Salantai, which was then part of Russia, won the 1946 Pulitzer Prize for Reporting for "his eyewitness account of the atom-bombing of Nagasaki and his subsequent ten articles on the development, production, and significance of the atomic bomb." Laurence, who was with "The New York Times", where he started in 1930, had published his first report on successful attempts to isolate uranium-235 in 1940. In 1945, General Leslie Groves summoned Laurence to the Los Alamos laboratory in New Mexico to serve as the official journalist of the Manhattan Project. Laurence was the only journalist present at the Trinity test in July 1945, and he was aboard an observational plane when the second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9. Nicknamed "Atomic Bill" to differentiate him from the paper's political reporter, William H. Lawrence, he published Dawn Over Zero, an account of the Trinity test, in 1946, and The Hell Bomb, a warning about the use of a cobalt bomb, in 1951. Laurence was apparently the first to use the term "the Atomic Age." He published his fourth book, excerpted here, in 1959. In 1956, Laurence was named Science Editor of "The New York Times", serving in that capacity until his retirement in 1964. In 2004, two journalists called for the Pulitzer Prize committee to revoke Laurence's 1946 award, alleging that he publically denied that there was any such thing as "radiation sickness," despite knowing otherwise from his work at Los Alamos. Lightly toned at lower edges. Otherwise, fine condition.

This website image may contain our company watermark. The actual item does not contain this watermark

See more listings from these signers
Make an offer today and get a quick response
Check your account for the status.

Following offer submission users will be contacted at their account email address within 48 hours. Our response will be to accept your offer, decline your offer or send you a final counteroffer. All offers can be viewed from within the "Document Offers" area of your HistoryForSale account. Please review the Make Offer Terms prior to making an offer.

If you have not received an offer acceptance or counter-offer email within 24-hours please check your spam/junk email folder.

 

World-Wide Shipping

Fast FedEx and USPS shipping

Authenticity Guaranteed

COA with every purchase

Questions Answered 24/7

Contact us day or night

Submit Offers

Get a quick response