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WILLIAM S. HART - AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED 03/20/1933 - HFSID 499

Hart handwrote, signed and dated this letter to Kay Hall in 1933. In it, he thanks Hall for "his corking letter" and threatens to bring "a couple a earthquakes in my pocket" if Hall doesn't visit soon.

Sale Price $680.00

Reg. $850.00

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WILLIAM S. HART
Hart handwrote, signed and dated this letter to Kay Hall in 1933. In it, he thanks Hall for "his corking letter" and threatens to bring "a couple a earthquakes in my pocket" if Hall doesn't visit soon.
Autograph letter signed: "Bill Hart", 1 page, 8½x10¾, on William S. Hart Company stationery from Horseshoe Ranch. March 20, 1933. Addressed to "Kay (Tex) Hall". In full: "Dear Kay (Tex) Hall - Thanks heaps for your corking letter - I'm glad you liked The "Life" - it's the only one I ever had - Next time I come to Chicago - if you don't come to see me - an' bring your gang - somethin's goin' to happen - I'll bring a couple a earthquakes in my pocket -an' set 'em off (sketch) You'll not "get" Hoofbeats -I'll send it to you- Always your friend". This letter includes a sketch of a smiley with a hand pointing at it and a notation in Hart's hand: "This is me!" "The 'Life'" is possibly his autobiography My Life East and West, published in 1929. Hart built a mansion at Horseshoe Ranch in Newhall, California in 1921. He lived there until his death. William S. Hart (1870-1946) began acting onstage in New York, going on to make his name as a Shakespearean actor on Broadway. By his 30s, he was a highly popular stage performer, particularly in western plays. He had spent his youth traveling around the country with his father, an itinerant laborer. Hart was 44 when he starred in his first film in 1914. Basing his westerns on his own memories of the West, he insisted on stark realism, using bare, unglamorous storylines that emphasized plot and character over action. In the early 20s, other western stars emerged who emphasized spectacular action and larger-than-life heroics, and Hart's popularity faded. In 1925, he made his final film, Tumbleweeds. Hart was a friend of legendary lawman Wyatt Earp and was a pallbearer at Earp's 1929 funeral. Lightly toned and creased. Page was neatly torn from pad at top edge. Adhesive residue on verso at top edge (no show-through). Folded once horizontally and twice vertically. Otherwise, fine condition.

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