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CHARLES A. LINDBERGH - TYPED LETTER SIGNED 03/19/1963 - HFSID 285868

CHARLES A. LINDBERGH "Lucky Lindy" talks about flying Jennies and why he dislikes reunions, ceremonies and dinners. TLS: "Charles", 1p, 8½x11. Germany, 1963 March 19. To Joe. On blue light-weight stationery. In full: "This is an awfully late answer to your January letter.

Sale Price $8,500.00

Reg. $10,000.00

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CHARLES A. LINDBERGH
"Lucky Lindy" talks about flying Jennies and why he dislikes reunions, ceremonies and dinners.
TLS: "Charles", 1p, 8½x11. Germany, 1963 March 19. To Joe. On blue light-weight stationery. In full: "This is an awfully late answer to your January letter. My mail is always hopelessly stacked up, literally, and I have taken taken (sic) some of it abroad with me in the hope of catching up a bit at least with the letters I want most to write. It is really good of you to invite me to the reunion of the 110th Observation Squadron, and I do have a very close feeling toward the Squadron -- I often think of the old days flying 'Jennies' at Lambert Field. But Joe, I think reunions are for those who like them (and may God bless them). To me, reunions are pretty awful; they always detract from qualities of memory which I prefer to leave to the past where I think they belong and have the greatest value. Also, I like to live quietly and to concentrate on my work and interests. I realized, many years ago, that this kind of life was simply not compatible with ceremonies and dinners, for one led to another and there seemed to be no end. With the exception of two in Washington, which came under the 'private' category, and which were more or less unavoidable, it is now close to a decade since I have attended a formal dinner. My last organization-dinner was at a meeting of the Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences, in 1954 as I remember, and there I gave my last address. Again many thanks, Joe. My deep appreciation goes to you with this letter. And my best wishes, always." This letter provides rare insight into Lindbergh's aversion to publicity. In November 1925, Lindbergh had enlisted in the 110th Observation Squadron, 35th division, Missouri National Guard and was soon promoted to First Lieutenant. The Curtiss Jenny was America's most famous World War I airplane. By the time production was terminated after the 1918 Armistice, more than 6,000 Jennies had been delivered to the U.S. Signal Corps. After the war, hundreds of the biplanes were sold on the civilian market and soon became the mainstay of the barnstormers of the 1920s. Lindbergh made extra money by barnstorming, stunt flying and even wing-walking on the Jennies. Lambert Field is in St. Louis. Content letters of Lindbergh are virtually unobtainable. Small blue ink rectangular doodle in upper right (unknown hand). Signature in black ink, horizontal fold touches the top of the "C", "h" and "l", else in fine condition.

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